Author Archive: Brian Sanchez

Lao to business firms: stop paying ‘revolutionary taxes’ or delay peace in Mindanao  

DAVAO CITY (MindaNews / 10 Dec) — The chair of the Mindanao Business Council (MinBC) has urged the business sector to stop paying “revolutionary taxes” to the New People’s Army (NPA) as they will only delay the solution to the insurgency problem in Mindanao.

In an interview at the sidelines of the MinBC 2017 Annual General Membership Meeting and Partners Forum Friday night, MinBC chair Vicente Lao urged companies to “put your foot down somewhere because the government feels if you support them, the short-term benefit is (your equipment) don’t get burned. But long-term effect of that is you are dragging the solution or you are making that worse.”

Lao said an “initial setback” may be expected as a result of not paying revolutionary taxes to NPA but refusing to pay will contribute to the overall solution to the insurgency problem.

SHOW OF FORCE. New Peoples Army rebels stand with their AK 47 rifles during a formation during the Communist Party of the Philippines 46th anniversary held in a small rural village in Marihatag, Surigao del Sur last Friday, Dec. 26, 2014. MindaNews file photo by Froilan Gallardo

President Rodrigo Duterte had earlier warned he would shut down businesses, most especially mining firms, that are continuously paying “revolutionary taxes” to the NPA.

The NPA and the Communist Party of the Philippines (CPP) had been designated as terrorist organizations with Proclamation No. 374 signed by President Rodrigo Duterte on December 5, pursuant to RA No. 10168, also known as the Terrorism Financing Prevention and Suppression Act of 2002.

Justice secretary Vitaliano Aguirre was subsequently directed to file a petition in the Regional Trial Court (RTC) under the provisions of the Human Security Act for its judicial affirmation.

The proclamation said the law “criminalizes the financing of terrorism and dealing with property or funds of designated persons/organizations, and prevents and suppresses the commission of said offenses through freezing and forfeiture of the property or funds of said designations persons/organizations, among others.

The law provides that it is the policy of the State to “protect life, liberty, and property from acts of terrorism, to condemn terrorism and those who support and finance it and to recognize it as inimical and dangerous to the national security of the country and the welfare of the people, and to make financing of terrorism a crime against the Filipino people, against humanity, and against the law of nations.”

Lao hopes government would immediately act on addressing the peace and security situation in Mindanao so that the business sector “can channel our finances and resources” to developing Mindanao.

He said some of the companies resorted to paying revolutionary taxes to the NPA to prevent trouble, as they were “left to fend for themselves” by the security sector in the past.

“No military was there to protect them before. The President is correct, if you give, you exacerbate the problem,” Lao said.

“We have to decide once and for all, if I go against the NPAs, the communists, well everybody has to reconfigure your relationship with the NPAs. Because if you continue to support financially, I will close you down,” Duterte said last November 21 in “Ang Huling Tikas Pahinga: Isang Pagpupugay sa mga Bayani ng Marawi” in Taguig.

Duterte issued Proclamation 360 on November 23, ordering the Presidential Adviser on Peace Process Jesus Dureza and the government peace negotiators to stop all peace talks with the communist group for failing to show “sincerity and commitment in pursuing genuine and meaningful peace negotiations as it engaged in acts of violence and hostilities, endangering the lives and properties of innocent people.”

The Proclamation was issued two days before the peace panels of the government and the National Democratic Front would resume a “discreet” fifth round of talks on November 25 to 27, 2017 in Oslo, Norway.  (Antonio L. Colina IV / MindaNews)

Comments

comments

Go to Source

Law professors published a 34-page list of ways people will game the GOP tax plan


paul ryanAFP
PHOTO / MANDEL NGAN

  • The Republican tax bills, passed with lightning speed,
    are turning out to be full of kinks.
  • A group of law professors analyzed the plan and wrote a
    paper about some of its unintended consequences.

Because they were rushed through Congress at lightning speed and
with barely more editing than your average blog post, the
Republican tax bills are turning out to be full of kinks.

Some of these mistakes—like the $289 billion tax
hike on corporations senators accidentally wrote into their
law at the last minute—have been widely covered. But many others
are just being discovered. “The more you read, the more you go,
‘Holy crap, what’s this?’” Greg Jenner, a former top tax official
in George W. Bush’s Treasury
Department, told Politico this week. “We will be
dealing with unintended consequences for months to come because
the bill is moving too fast.”

This week, a group of 13 tax law professors and lawyers, many of
whom have been vocal opponents of the Republican plan, published
a 34-page paper offering a taste of what those unintended
consequences might be. You know how people have been joking about
incorporating themselves ever since these tax bills started
kicking around? That’s almost certainly going to be a thing.

Investors may be able to shelter their investment profits by
stuffing them into C-Corporations, which are in line for a low,
20 percent tax rate. Many individuals could save on their income
taxes by gaming proposed tax breaks for passthrough
businesses—firms like partnerships and LLCs that aren’t subject
to the corporate rate. Baseball players will probably start
separate companies to collect all of their endorsement and
licensing royalties while saving on taxes. A law firm could split
itself into multiple pieces in order to minimize its associates’
IRS bills. Here’s how that last scheme would work:

Law firm associates, LLC. Under the
Senate bill, there is potentially a major problem as drafted:
Employees may be able to benefit from the pass-through provision
by forming a pass-through of which they are an owner. To achieve
the tax savings, no longer be an employee (who cannot benefit
from the provision); instead be an owner (who can benefit from
the provision).

For example, law firm associates (and other employees of the
firm) should no longer be mere associates. They should instead be
partners in Associates, LLC—a separate partnership paid to
provide services to the original firm. Their “profit share”—in
lieu of salary—from Associates, LLC would then be given the
special low pass-through rate. There are restrictions on
lawyers—since they provide a personal service, which is
disfavored in the bill—from benefiting from the special
pass-through rate, but those restrictions would not apply to
these associates.

So long as the associate (or really partner in Associates,
LLC) makes less than $500,000 in taxable income (for a married
couple) or $250,000 (for a single individual), they would be
fully eligible. And that covers a lot of law firm associates, not
to mention many other people who are now employees—but who may
not be for long.

Some of the issues the professors found aren’t loopholes so much
as unintentionally perverse incentives that could, for instance,
encourage companies to shift employment and investment overseas
(which is the exact opposite of what this bill is supposedly
intended to do). But rather than run through each problem,
one-by-one, I’d rather make a few big picture points.

First, as the paper’s authors note, all of these loopholes
suggest that the GOP’s tax plans will cost far more than the
Joint Committee on Taxation has officially projected. The JCT
appears to think that the bill’s anti-abuse provisions are good
enough to keep revenue from leaking out. Given what we’re
learning, that is probably a fanciful assumption.

Second, it’s not clear how worried Republicans are about these
loopholes, if at all. Some may even see them as a plus. The party
is attempting to cut taxes as deeply as possible, and—other than
Sen. Bob Corker—its members have largely treated deficit
restrictions as annoyances to be worked around. My guess is they
won’t put a ton of energy into making sure their final bill is
air tight, especially since lobbyists aren’t likely to make much
noise about mistakes that could save their clients money.

Finally, if Democrats do ever win another federal election,
they’ll have to spend a lot of time fixing the half-considered,
rough-draft of a tax code Republicans are busily slapping
together. That means not just talking about how much to raise
rates on the wealthy, but thinking about how to restructure and
rationalize the system. The sooner they start considering that,
the better; after all, we’ve just seen what happens when you try
to write a bill the night before it’s due.

Read the original article on Slate. Copyright 2017. Follow Slate on Twitter.

Go to Source

Ifrah Law’s Michelle Cohen Named VP of the National Women’s Party’s Executive Committee

Dec 10, 2017 (MarketersMedia via COMTEX) — The National Woman’s Party was a key organization in the fight for women’s suffrage.

Washington, D.C. – December 10, 2017 /MarketersMedia/ —

Michelle Cohen, Chair of the E-Commerce Group for Ifrah Law PLCC, has been elected to the Executive Committee of the National Woman’s Party (NWP) at the Belmont-Paul Women’s Equality National Monument in Washington, D.C. Her title will be Vice President, Legal. Cohen joined the NWP Board of Directors in 2015.

Formed in 1916 by Alice Paul and Lucy Burns, the National Woman’s Party was a key organization in the fight for women’s suffrage, which resulted in the 19th Amendment to the Constitution in 1920. Today, based at the Belmont-Paul Women’s Equality National Monument on Capitol Hill in Washington D.C., the group produces educational programs, tours, exhibits, research and publications that explore the evolving role of women and their contributions to society. The National Monument houses an extensive collection of suffrage banners, archives and artifacts documenting the continuing effort by women and men of all races, religions and backgrounds to win voting rights and equality for women under the law.

“It’s a privilege to serve on the Board and now, the Executive Committee of the National Woman’s Party,” said Michelle Cohen. “I’m proud to associate myself with an organization with such history and whose founders literally went to jail to secure my right to vote and that of all American women. The issues of women’s advancement, pay equity, and representation on boards and across industries are causes for which I have advocated for years. I look forward to helping the NWP continue its mission in empowering all women through voting rights.”

As Chair of Ifrah Law’s E-Commerce Group, Michelle Cohen focuses on privacy, consumer protection, e-commerce, communications and media-related issues. She also advises clients on data privacy, security, direct marketing, online sweepstakes and promotions and emerging technologies. She has nearly 25 years of experience representing traditional and online companies before the Federal Communications Commission, the Federal Trade Commission, state attorneys general and other federal and state agencies.

Earlier this year, Cohen was named a 2016 Top Rated Litigator by American Lawyer Media (ALM) and The National Law Journal. In 2013, American Lawyer named her one of Washington D.C.’s Women Leaders in Law, and in 2012 was named an ALM Top Technology Lawyer.

Cohen received her B.A. from Brandeis University and her J.D. from Emory University School of Law, where she was the Editor-in-Chief of the Emory Law Journal and the Fyr Scholar. She works with various pro bono programs, is a Special Olympics volunteer, active in alumni networks, and is a member of the Women’s Bar Association of D.C. She is also a former Board member for the Law Firms Division of the United Way of the National Capitol Area and Women in Cable Telecommunications.

About Ifrah Law:

Ifrah Law is a Washington, D.C.-based law firm that represents clients in a variety of litigation settings. Founded in 2009, the firm specializes in Internet advertising, iGaming, government contracts and healthcare.�?�Its attorneys also author three noted blogs: www.ifrahonigaming.com, covering all aspects on online gaming, www.ftcbeat.com, FTC and State AG News for Ecommerce, and www.crimeinthesuites.com, an analysis of current issues in white collar defense. For more information, please visit www.ifrahlaw.com.

Jeff Ifrah Law – Hands-on Counsel, Gloves-off Litigation: http://www.jeffifrahlaw.com

Jeff Ifrah – White-Collar Washington DC based Legal Expert: http://jeffifrahdc.com

Jeff Ifrah – Widely Recognized White-Collar Criminal Defense Lawyer: http://jeffifrahnews.com

Contact Info:
Name: JIL
Email: contact@jeffifrahlaw.com
Organization: JeffIfrahLaw.com

Video URL: https://www.youtube.com/user/jeffifrah

Source URL: https://marketersmedia.com/ifrah-laws-michelle-cohen-named-vp-of-the-national-womens-partys-executive-committee-2/275712

For more information, please visit http://jeffifrahlaw.com

Source: MarketersMedia

Release ID: 275712

Go to Source

US defence firms want security of info in India

NEW DELHI: Leading US defence firms are pushing for a specific framework in India to ensure the safety and security of critical technology and classified defence information when they are shared with the private sector for joint ventures in the country.

A top official of the US-India Business Council (USIBC) said they also want a government-to-government agreement to facilitate the transfer of classified defence technology and information to the Indian private sector besides clarity on issues relating to liability, intellectual property rights and industrial safety.

Benjamin Schwartz, senior director for Defense and Aerospace at the Washington-based USIBC, said there was no provision for sharing classified defence information by American companies with the Indian private sector at present and a government-to-government agreement was necessary to facilitate it.

“US companies are willing to ensure transfer of critical technology to India but the Indian government has to ensure protection of critical and classified technology,” he told PTI in an interview.

Schwartz, who held extensive talks with the defence establishment here on several sticky issues during a visit to India, said under the existing framework, American companies can share classified information and technology with India’s defence public sector undertakings (DPSUs) and not with the private sector.

“Right now, there is no mechanism in place to allow the US companies to extend classified information to private Indian industries,” he said, adding it was for New Delhi to initiate the process for a government-to-government agreement to remove the hurdle.

The USIBC has been playing a pro-active role in forging greater collaboration between Indian and American defence industries.

Holding that the American industry was very supportive of India’s strategic partnership model, he said the Indian government needed to come out with a timeline for various acquisition programmes, besides establishing a framework for the safety of classified information and technology.

“They need to establish procedures to ensure security of defence technology here. What I mean by it is that the reality in India and also in the US and around the world is that information is being stolen … We have to set up procedures to make sure that our defence technology is secure (in India),” he said.

Schwartz said Washington “definitely” wanted to go for an agreement to facilitate the transfer of classified information and technology by American companies to India and that “it is about getting things done in New Delhi.”

He said the American private defence industry was in touch with the Trump administration on the issue of technology transfer to India and the US government has been very supportive of such collaborations.

“We held extensive conversations with the US government on technology transfer. We are very pleased that there has been a lot of continuity in US policy. The Trump administration wants to continue to prioritise technology release to India. It is also going to be re-articulated in US law this year,” he said.

Schwartz said the USIBC supports Modi government’s policy initiative to ensure a level playing field for the DPSUs and India’s private sector defence industry.

“We can help support this through an agreement that will allow us to share classified information with the private sector industry,” he said.

A number of American defence giants including Boeing and Lockheed Martin are eyeing billions of dollars of contracts in India and have already offered to manufacture some of their key military platforms in India while forging joint ventures with Indian companies.

Schwartz said liability issues, intellectual property rights issues and industrial security procedures are some of the key areas the US firms want clarity on.

“I think we are quite hopeful that with communication and goodwill we can reach out solutions.”

Indo-US defence ties are on an upswing and both New Delhi and Washington have said they are committed to expanding it further.

In June 2016, the US had designated India a “Major Defence Partner” intending to elevate defence trade and technology sharing with India to a level commensurate with that of its closest allies and partners.


Go to Source

US defence firms want security of info in IndiaLeading US defence firms are pushing for a specific framework in India to ensure the safety and security of critical technology and classified defence information when they are shared with the private…

NEW DELHI: Leading US defence firms are pushing for a specific framework in India to ensure the safety and security of critical technology and classified defence information when they are shared with the private sector for joint ventures in the country.

A top official of the US-India Business Council (USIBC) said they also want a government-to-government agreement to facilitate the transfer of classified defence technology and information to the Indian private sector besides clarity on issues relating to liability, intellectual property rights and industrial safety.

Benjamin Schwartz, senior director for Defense and Aerospace at the Washington-based USIBC, said there was no provision for sharing classified defence information by American companies with the Indian private sector at present and a government-to-government agreement was necessary to facilitate it.

“US companies are willing to ensure transfer of critical technology to India but the Indian government has to ensure protection of critical and classified technology,” he told PTI in an interview.

Schwartz, who held extensive talks with the defence establishment here on several sticky issues during a visit to India, said under the existing framework, American companies can share classified information and technology with India’s defence public sector undertakings (DPSUs) and not with the private sector.

“Right now, there is no mechanism in place to allow the US companies to extend classified information to private Indian industries,” he said, adding it was for New Delhi to initiate the process for a government-to-government agreement to remove the hurdle.

The USIBC has been playing a pro-active role in forging greater collaboration between Indian and American defence industries.

Holding that the American industry was very supportive of India’s strategic partnership model, he said the Indian government needed to come out with a timeline for various acquisition programmes, besides establishing a framework for the safety of classified information and technology.

“They need to establish procedures to ensure security of defence technology here. What I mean by it is that the reality in India and also in the US and around the world is that information is being stolen … We have to set up procedures to make sure that our defence technology is secure (in India),” he said.

Schwartz said Washington “definitely” wanted to go for an agreement to facilitate the transfer of classified information and technology by American companies to India and that “it is about getting things done in New Delhi.”

He said the American private defence industry was in touch with the Trump administration on the issue of technology transfer to India and the US government has been very supportive of such collaborations.

“We held extensive conversations with the US government on technology transfer. We are very pleased that there has been a lot of continuity in US policy. The Trump administration wants to continue to prioritise technology release to India. It is also going to be re-articulated in US law this year,” he said.

Schwartz said the USIBC supports Modi government’s policy initiative to ensure a level playing field for the DPSUs and India’s private sector defence industry.

“We can help support this through an agreement that will allow us to share classified information with the private sector industry,” he said.

A number of American defence giants including Boeing and Lockheed Martin are eyeing billions of dollars of contracts in India and have already offered to manufacture some of their key military platforms in India while forging joint ventures with Indian companies.

Schwartz said liability issues, intellectual property rights issues and industrial security procedures are some of the key areas the US firms want clarity on.

“I think we are quite hopeful that with communication and goodwill we can reach out solutions.”

Indo-US defence ties are on an upswing and both New Delhi and Washington have said they are committed to expanding it further.

In June 2016, the US had designated India a “Major Defence Partner” intending to elevate defence trade and technology sharing with India to a level commensurate with that of its closest allies and partners.


Go to Source

US defence firms for tech transfer if India ensures safety of critical info

NEW DELHI: Leading US defence firms are pushing for a specific framework in India to ensure the safety and security of critical technology and classified defence information when they are shared with the private sector for joint ventures in the country.

A top official of the US-India Business Council (USIBC) said they also want a government-to-government agreement to facilitate the transfer of classified defence technology and information to the Indian private sector besides clarity on issues relating to liability, intellectual property rights and industrial safety.

Benjamin Schwartz, senior director for Defense and Aerospace at the Washington-based USIBC, said there was no provision for sharing classified defence information by American companies with the Indian private sector at present and a government-to-government agreement was necessary to facilitate it.

“US companies are willing to ensure transfer of critical technology to India but the Indian government has to ensure protection of critical and classified technology,” he told PTI in an interview.

Schwartz, who held extensive talks with the defence establishment here on several sticky issues during a visit to India, said under the existing framework, American companies can share classified information and technology with India’s defence public sector undertakings (DPSUs) and not with the private sector.

“Right now, there is no mechanism in place to allow the US companies to extend classified information to private Indian industries,” he said, adding it was for New Delhi to initiate the process for a government-to-government agreement to remove the hurdle.

The USIBC has been playing a pro-active role in forging greater collaboration between Indian and American defence industries.

Holding that the American industry was very supportive of India’s strategic partnership model, he said the Indian government needed to come out with a timeline for various acquisition programmes, besides establishing a framework for the safety of classified information and technology.

“They need to establish procedures to ensure security of defence technology here. What I mean by it is that the reality in India and also in the US and around the world is that information is being stolen … We have to set up procedures to make sure that our defence technology is secure (in India),” he said.

Schwartz said Washington “definitely” wanted to go for an agreement to facilitate the transfer of classified information and technology by American companies to India and that “it is about getting things done in New Delhi.”

He said the American private defence industry was in touch with the Trump administration on the issue of technology transfer to India and the US government has been very supportive of such collaborations.

“We held extensive conversations with the US government on technology transfer. We are very pleased that there has been a lot of continuity in US policy. The Trump administration wants to continue to prioritise technology release to India. It is also going to be re-articulated in US law this year,” he said.

Schwartz said the USIBC supports Modi government’s policy initiative to ensure a level playing field for the DPSUs and India’s private sector defence industry.

“We can help support this through an agreement that will allow us to share classified information with the private sector industry,” he said.

A number of American defence giants including Boeing and Lockheed Martin are eyeing billions of dollars of contracts in India and have already offered to manufacture some of their key military platforms in India while forging joint ventures with Indian companies.

Schwartz said liability issues, intellectual property rights issues and industrial security procedures are some of the key areas the US firms want clarity on.

“I think we are quite hopeful that with communication and goodwill we can reach out solutions.”

Indo-US defence ties are on an upswing and both New Delhi and Washington have said they are committed to expanding it further.

In June 2016, the US had designated India a “Major Defence Partner” intending to elevate defence trade and technology sharing with India to a level commensurate with that of its closest allies and partners.


Go to Source

US military firms want security of classified defence info in India for JVs

NEW DELHI: Leading US defence firms are pushing for a specific framework in India to ensure the safety and security of critical technology and classified defence information when they are shared with the private sector for joint ventures in the country.

A top official of the US-India Business Council (USIBC) said they also want a government-to-government agreement to facilitate the transfer of classified defence technology and information to the Indian private sector besides clarity on issues relating to liability, intellectual property rights and industrial safety.

Benjamin Schwartz, senior director for Defense and Aerospace at the Washington-based USIBC, said there was no provision for sharing classified defence information by American companies with the Indian private sector at present and a government-to-government agreement was necessary to facilitate it.

“US companies are willing to ensure transfer of critical technology to India but the Indian government has to ensure protection of critical and classified technology,” he told PTI in an interview.

Schwartz, who held extensive talks with the defence establishment here on several sticky issues during a visit to India, said under the existing framework, American companies can share classified information and technology with India’s defence public sector undertakings (DPSUs) and not with the private sector.

“Right now, there is no mechanism in place to allow the US companies to extend classified information to private Indian industries,” he said, adding it was for New Delhi to initiate the process for a government-to-government agreement to remove the hurdle.

The USIBC has been playing a pro-active role in forging greater collaboration between Indian and American defence industries.

Holding that the American industry was very supportive of India’s strategic partnership model, he said the Indian government needed to come out with a timeline for various acquisition programmes, besides establishing a framework for the safety of classified information and technology.

“They need to establish procedures to ensure security of defence technology here. What I mean by it is that the reality in India and also in the US and around the world is that information is being stolen … We have to set up procedures to make sure that our defence technology is secure (in India),” he said.

Schwartz said Washington “definitely” wanted to go for an agreement to facilitate the transfer of classified information and technology by American companies to India and that “it is about getting things done in New Delhi.”

He said the American private defence industry was in touch with the Trump administration on the issue of technology transfer to India and the US government has been very supportive of such collaborations.

“We held extensive conversations with the US government on technology transfer. We are very pleased that there has been a lot of continuity in US policy. The Trump administration wants to continue to prioritise technology release to India. It is also going to be re-articulated in US law this year,” he said.

Schwartz said the USIBC supports Modi government’s policy initiative to ensure a level playing field for the DPSUs and India’s private sector defence industry.

“We can help support this through an agreement that will allow us to share classified information with the private sector industry,” he said.

A number of American defence giants including Boeing and Lockheed Martin are eyeing billions of dollars of contracts in India and have already offered to manufacture some of their key military platforms in India while forging joint ventures with Indian companies.

Schwartz said liability issues, intellectual property rights issues and industrial security procedures are some of the key areas the US firms want clarity on.

“I think we are quite hopeful that with communication and goodwill we can reach out solutions.”

Indo-US defence ties are on an upswing and both New Delhi and Washington have said they are committed to expanding it further.

In June 2016, the US had designated India a “Major Defence Partner” intending to elevate defence trade and technology sharing with India to a level commensurate with that of its closest allies and partners.


Go to Source

US defence firms for tech transfer if India ensures safety of critical infoLeading US defence firms are pushing for a specific framework in India to ensure the safety and security of critical technology and classified defence information when they are…

NEW DELHI: Leading US defence firms are pushing for a specific framework in India to ensure the safety and security of critical technology and classified defence information when they are shared with the private sector for joint ventures in the country.

A top official of the US-India Business Council (USIBC) said they also want a government-to-government agreement to facilitate the transfer of classified defence technology and information to the Indian private sector besides clarity on issues relating to liability, intellectual property rights and industrial safety.

Benjamin Schwartz, senior director for Defense and Aerospace at the Washington-based USIBC, said there was no provision for sharing classified defence information by American companies with the Indian private sector at present and a government-to-government agreement was necessary to facilitate it.

“US companies are willing to ensure transfer of critical technology to India but the Indian government has to ensure protection of critical and classified technology,” he told PTI in an interview.

Schwartz, who held extensive talks with the defence establishment here on several sticky issues during a visit to India, said under the existing framework, American companies can share classified information and technology with India’s defence public sector undertakings (DPSUs) and not with the private sector.

“Right now, there is no mechanism in place to allow the US companies to extend classified information to private Indian industries,” he said, adding it was for New Delhi to initiate the process for a government-to-government agreement to remove the hurdle.

The USIBC has been playing a pro-active role in forging greater collaboration between Indian and American defence industries.

Holding that the American industry was very supportive of India’s strategic partnership model, he said the Indian government needed to come out with a timeline for various acquisition programmes, besides establishing a framework for the safety of classified information and technology.

“They need to establish procedures to ensure security of defence technology here. What I mean by it is that the reality in India and also in the US and around the world is that information is being stolen … We have to set up procedures to make sure that our defence technology is secure (in India),” he said.

Schwartz said Washington “definitely” wanted to go for an agreement to facilitate the transfer of classified information and technology by American companies to India and that “it is about getting things done in New Delhi.”

He said the American private defence industry was in touch with the Trump administration on the issue of technology transfer to India and the US government has been very supportive of such collaborations.

“We held extensive conversations with the US government on technology transfer. We are very pleased that there has been a lot of continuity in US policy. The Trump administration wants to continue to prioritise technology release to India. It is also going to be re-articulated in US law this year,” he said.

Schwartz said the USIBC supports Modi government’s policy initiative to ensure a level playing field for the DPSUs and India’s private sector defence industry.

“We can help support this through an agreement that will allow us to share classified information with the private sector industry,” he said.

A number of American defence giants including Boeing and Lockheed Martin are eyeing billions of dollars of contracts in India and have already offered to manufacture some of their key military platforms in India while forging joint ventures with Indian companies.

Schwartz said liability issues, intellectual property rights issues and industrial security procedures are some of the key areas the US firms want clarity on.

“I think we are quite hopeful that with communication and goodwill we can reach out solutions.”

Indo-US defence ties are on an upswing and both New Delhi and Washington have said they are committed to expanding it further.

In June 2016, the US had designated India a “Major Defence Partner” intending to elevate defence trade and technology sharing with India to a level commensurate with that of its closest allies and partners.


Go to Source

US defence firms want security of info in India

NEW DELHI: Leading US defence firms are pushing for a specific framework in India to ensure the safety and security of critical technology and classified defence information when they are shared with the Indian private sector for joint ventures in India.

A top official of the US-India Business Council (USIBC) said they also want a government-to-government agreement to facilitate the transfer of classified defence technology and information to the Indian private sector besides clarity on issues relating to liability, intellectual property rights and industrial safety.

Benjamin Schwartz, Senior Director for Defense and Aerospace at the Washington-based USIBC, said there was no provision for sharing classified defence information by American companies with the Indian private sector at present and a government-to-government agreement was necessary to facilitate it.

“US companies are willing to ensure transfer of critical technology to India but the Indian government has to ensure protection of critical and classified technology,” he told in an interview.

Schwartz, who held extensive talks with the defence establishment here on several sticky issues during a visit to India, said under the existing framework, American companies can share classified information and technology with India’s defence public sector undertakings (DPSUs) and not with the private sector.

“Right now, there is no mechanism in place to allow the US companies to extend classified information to private Indian industries,” he said, adding it was for New Delhi to initiate the process for a government-to-government agreement to remove the hurdle.

The USIBC has been playing a pro-active role in forging greater collaboration between Indian and American defence industries.

Holding that the American industry was very supportive of India’s strategic partnership model, he said the Indian government needed to come out with a timeline for various acquisition programmes, besides establishing a framework for the safety of classified information and technology.

“They need to establish procedures to ensure security of defence technology here. What I mean by it is that the reality in India and also in the US and around the world is that information is being stolen…We have to set up procedures to make sure that our defence technology is secure (in India),” he said.

Schwartz said Washington “definitely” wanted to go for an agreement to facilitate the transfer of classified information and technology by American companies to India and that “it is about getting things done in New Delhi.”

He said the American private defence industry was in touch with the Trump administration on the issue of technology transfer to India and the US government has been very supportive of such collaborations.

“We held extensive conversations with the US government on technology transfer. We are very pleased that there has been a lot of continuity in US policy. The Trump administration wants to continue to prioritise technology release to India. It is also going to be re-articulated in US law this year,” he said.

Schwartz said the USIBC supports Modi government’s policy initiative to ensure a level playing field for the DPSUs and India’s private sector defence industry.

“We can help support this through an agreement that will allow us to share classified information with the private sector industry,” he said.

A number of American defence giants including Boeing and Lockheed Martin are eyeing billions of dollars of contracts in India and have already offered to manufacture some of their key military platforms in India while forging joint ventures with Indian companies.

Schwartz said liability issues, intellectual property rights issues and industrial security procedures are some of the key areas the US firms want clarity on.

“I think we are quite hopeful that with communication and goodwill we can reach out solutions.”

Indo-US defence ties are on an upswing and both New Delhi and Washington have said they are committed to expanding it further.

In June 2016, the US had designated India a “Major Defence Partner” intending to elevate defence trade and technology sharing with India to a level commensurate with that of its closest allies and partners.

Go to Source

US military firms want security of classified defence info in India for JVs

NEW DELHI: Leading US defence firms are pushing for a specific framework in India to ensure the safety and security of critical technology and classified defence information when they are shared with the Indian private sector for joint ventures in India.

A top official of the US-India Business Council (USIBC) said they also want a government-to-government agreement to facilitate the transfer of classified defence technology and information to the Indian private sector besides clarity on issues relating to liability, intellectual property rights and industrial safety.

Benjamin Schwartz, Senior Director for Defense and Aerospace at the Washington-based USIBC, said there was no provision for sharing classified defence information by American companies with the Indian private sector at present and a government-to-government agreement was necessary to facilitate it.

“US companies are willing to ensure transfer of critical technology to India but the Indian government has to ensure protection of critical and classified technology,” he told in an interview.

Schwartz, who held extensive talks with the defence establishment here on several sticky issues during a visit to India, said under the existing framework, American companies can share classified information and technology with India’s defence public sector undertakings (DPSUs) and not with the private sector.

“Right now, there is no mechanism in place to allow the US companies to extend classified information to private Indian industries,” he said, adding it was for New Delhi to initiate the process for a government-to-government agreement to remove the hurdle.

The USIBC has been playing a pro-active role in forging greater collaboration between Indian and American defence industries.

Holding that the American industry was very supportive of India’s strategic partnership model, he said the Indian government needed to come out with a timeline for various acquisition programmes, besides establishing a framework for the safety of classified information and technology.

“They need to establish procedures to ensure security of defence technology here. What I mean by it is that the reality in India and also in the US and around the world is that information is being stolen…We have to set up procedures to make sure that our defence technology is secure (in India),” he said.

Schwartz said Washington “definitely” wanted to go for an agreement to facilitate the transfer of classified information and technology by American companies to India and that “it is about getting things done in New Delhi.”

He said the American private defence industry was in touch with the Trump administration on the issue of technology transfer to India and the US government has been very supportive of such collaborations.

“We held extensive conversations with the US government on technology transfer. We are very pleased that there has been a lot of continuity in US policy. The Trump administration wants to continue to prioritise technology release to India. It is also going to be re-articulated in US law this year,” he said.

Schwartz said the USIBC supports Modi government’s policy initiative to ensure a level playing field for the DPSUs and India’s private sector defence industry.

“We can help support this through an agreement that will allow us to share classified information with the private sector industry,” he said.

A number of American defence giants including Boeing and Lockheed Martin are eyeing billions of dollars of contracts in India and have already offered to manufacture some of their key military platforms in India while forging joint ventures with Indian companies.

Schwartz said liability issues, intellectual property rights issues and industrial security procedures are some of the key areas the US firms want clarity on.

“I think we are quite hopeful that with communication and goodwill we can reach out solutions.”

Indo-US defence ties are on an upswing and both New Delhi and Washington have said they are committed to expanding it further.

In June 2016, the US had designated India a “Major Defence Partner” intending to elevate defence trade and technology sharing with India to a level commensurate with that of its closest allies and partners.

Go to Source