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C.A. Affirms Dismissal of Law Firms in Conspiracy Action

Metropolitan News-Enterprise

 

Friday, November
17, 2017

 

Page 1

 

C.A. Affirms Dismissal of Law Firms in Conspiracy Action

Justice Johnson Says Anti-SLAPP Motion Was Properly Granted
Where Conduct Took the Form Of Legal Representation; Ruling Is Latest
Installment in Protracted Litigation Over $35 Million

 

By a MetNews
Staff Writer

 

The Court of
Appeal for this district yesterday affirmed a judgment of dismissal, pursuant
to an anti-SLAPP motion, in an action that accused lawyers in two firms of
acting in collusion with their client in converting and fraudulently
transferring $13 million.

The
plaintiff is Optional Capital, Inc., a Korean venture capital firm that alleges
that one of its investors, DAS Corporation, along with certain
individualsErica Kim, Christopher Kim, and Bora Leetried to wrest control of
it in 2001, and pilfered $35 million of its funds. Litigation over the funds
has been going on since 2003 when DAS sued the Kim defendants.

A 2014
Court of Appeal opinion for this district observes that the case involves an
extremely tangled thicket of legal proceedings in both state and federal court,
as well as in Switzerland.

One
Installment

Justice
Jeffrey Johnson of Div. One, said in that opinionupsetting a dismissal of the
action against DAS following the granting of an anti-SLAPP motionthat the
appeal was but one installment in Optional Capital, Inc.s attempt to recover
monies it contends were looted from its corporate coffers in 2000 and 2001.

The
latest installment is yesterdays affirmance of Los Angeles Superior Court
Judge Teresa Sanchez-Gordon grant of an anti-SLAPP motion to DASs attorneys,
in an opinion again written by Johnson. Unlike the 2014 opinion, it was not
certified for publication.

The
prevailing defendants are Akin Gump Straus Hauer & Feld LLP, an
international law firm with more than 900 attorneys (denominated in the
opinion, Akin) and Parker Shumaker Mills LLP, a 10-lawyer firm, sued along
with its principals, David Parker and William K. Mills (referred to as
Parker).

First Prong

Johnson
said in yesterdays unpublished opinion that the first prong of the anti-SLAPP
statutethat the actions complained of arose from protected activityis met,
because they all arose directly out of the litigation in which they were
respectively representing DAS.

The
plaintiff wants to hold Akin accountable for the transfer of funds from a Swiss
account to DAS. More than $15 million in allegedly stolen funds were shifted to
an account in Genevas Credit Suisse Bank in 2003 by a company owned by the
Kims; in 2010, DAS, represented by Akin, settled with the Kims, through
mediation; Optional was not involved in that settlement; the Swiss government
unfroze the funds; about $13 million went to DAS.

Optional
avers that the defendants agreed on a common plan…to fraudulently transfer
13 million dollars from the Credit Suisse Bank account to DAS and thereby
hinder, delay or defraud OPTIONAL in recovering that property.

Federal Forfeiture
Action

Parker
represented DAS as a claimant in a federal forfeiture action the U.S.
government brought based on the Kim parties looting of Optional. Optional
contends it was prejudiced by Parkers alleged delay in informing the court of
the settlement.

Johnson
wrote:

In
short, the gravamen of Plaintiffs claims against Defendants is based on
protected activity, namely Defendants representation of DAS in litigation (the
state court action and the federal forfeiture action). Accordingly, we hold
that Defendants made a prima facie showing that Plaintiffs claims arise from
Defendants constitutionally protected petition rights.

Second Prong

He
said the second prong of the anti-SLAPP statuteprobability that the defendants
would prevail on the meritsis also met, declaring:

Here,
Defendants met their burden of showing that the litigation privilege applies
because the communicative conduct at issueas established by the pleadings and
documents submitted in connection with motionswas made in judicial or quasi-judicial
proceedings (i.e., the state court action, the federal forfeiture action, and
the private mediation in the state court action) by attorneys for DAS to
achieve the object of the proceedings and had some connection or logical
relation to the action.

The
case is
Optional
Capital v. Akin Gump Strauss Hauer & Feld LLP
, B275274.

Attorneys
on appeal were Ralph Rogari and Mary Lee for Optional; Gordon A. Greenberg and
Charles Edward Weir of McDermott, Will & Emery, for Akin Gump, Strauss,
Hauer & Feld LLP and Raul L. Martinez, Kenneth C. Feldman and Larissa G.
Nefulda of Lewis Brisbois Bisgaard & Smith for Parker Shumaker Mills LLP,
David Parker and William K. Mills.

Feldman
said yesterday:

We
are gratified that our client, Parker Mills LLP (formerly Parker Shumaker Mills
LLP) prevailed and that the Court of Appeal recognized the distinction between
litigants and the attorneys who loyally advocate and serve their interests.
Page 33 of the opinion is particularly telling wherein the Court of Appeal joined
with an earlier published case in expressing grave concern about inferring an
attorney-client conspiracy from the mere existence of an attorney-client
relationship.

 As
someone whose practice is devoted almost exclusively to defending other lawyers,
I believe that litigants should think long and hard about suing former
adversary counsel, as this case demonstrates.

 

Copyright
2017, Metropolitan News Company

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Long-term growth for law market

In its annual Law Firm Perspective, real estate group JLL highlighted how Grand Rapids’ law market is poised for growth as outside groups are entering the market.

Two Detroit-based law firms, Honigman and Bodman, have penetrated the city’s market in 2017 with intentions for long-term growth. Honigman is located at 300 Ottawa Ave. NW, and Bodman’s office is temporarily located in Calder Plaza at 250 Monroe Ave. NW.

“The guys coming from Detroit are expanding their Michigan presence,” said Harrison West, research analyst for JLL. “Given Grand Rapids’ metro economic growth, they see it as an opportunity to expand their presence in the state.”

In addition to new players in the market, existing downtown law firms have moved or are in the process of moving into new and more efficient space. Warner Norcross and Judd announced it will move from its office at 111 Lyon St. NW into the new $63.5-million development at 150 Ottawa Ave., a year after Miller Johnson moved into the Arena Place development.

“As for the firms at home in Grand Rapids, they want to expand to maintain their presence and attract and retain talent,” West said. “We want to keep talent in the state and in our cities.”

Typical lease terms for 2017 have been 10-year terms for new development with an average of $28 base rent per square foot (psf), a five-year term for renewals with a base rent of $20 psf and 10 years for relocations with a base rent of $20 psf. No average for subleases was recorded, as the trend of law firms opting for new, higher-quality space has rendered sublease spaces obsolete for law firms.

Occupancy growth has steadily increased year-over-year, from a net absorption of over 150,000 square feet in 2014 to over 250,000 in 2016. JLL predicts net absorption to be even higher at the end of 2017. Steady occupancy will continue to push down vacancy, and rental rates are projected to increase.

For the future, JLL predicted law firm activity and absorption will slow, as many of the recently executed leases by law firms have been long-term commitments. Current construction also will lead to new space opportunities downtown.

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After Trump’s election, more students consider law school, hoping to make a difference

The election of President Donald Trump pushed Tiffany Boguslawski over the edge.

The 19-year-old aspiring politician knew she wanted to be a lawyer, but the new president, who shares her hard-line stance on immigration and international trade, sealed the deal.

Boguslawski, a triple-major in political science, history and global affairs, is among a group of students across the political spectrum who were so moved by last November’s election that they decided to take the Law School Admissions Test, or LSAT, because they view law school as a means to making a difference.

In the past year, the number of people taking the test, which is administered nationally four times a year, has surged. In February, 21,400 people took it, up 5.4 percent from a year earlier. In June, the number of test-takers was up 19.8 percent year-over-year, to 27,606 people. And the number of people who took the test in September rose 10.7 percent from a year ago, to 37,146 people. As of Oct. 30, registrations for the Dec. 2 exam were up 21.4 percent.

In 2013, 84.5 percent of graduates fresh out of law school found jobs, a substantial decline from headier days. In 2007, nearly 92 percent of law grads nationwide found jobs. Since then, the job market is slowly reaching a new normal. In Chicago area there are 23,000 lawyers, who make on average, $134,200.

The job market is “way better than it was in the worst of the aftermath of the recession,” said James Leipold, executive director of the National Association of Law Placement. “It’s not nearly as good as it was in the glory days before the recession.”

The only real area of job growth has been at the biggest law firms, with 500 or more attorneys. “Hiring at the other (small and midsized) law firms have been flat or fewer jobs,” he said, adding,“The biggest law firms are still hiring about 1,000 fewer associates than they did before the recession.”

For some wannabe attorneys, the numbers mean keeping your eye on the prize, regardless of the political climate.

Robert Baurley, a senior and co-founder of Loyola’s Pre-Law Society, knew he wanted to be a lawyer years before Trump was elected. Baurley, 22, took the LSAT in September and plans to take it again next year to improve his score. He’s interned with an assistant district attorney in his native Pennsylvania, he said, and is working to get into his dream school, the University of Pennsylvania Law School.

As far as Baurley, is concerned, people motivated by the election of Donald Trump should reassess why they want to invest in a legal education. The current political climate Baurley said, is merely a momentary glimpse of time. “For me, I’ve known forever that I wanted to be an attorney.”

crshropshire@chicagotribune.com

Twitter @corilyns

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The latest Trump bump? More students considering law school

The election of President Donald Trump pushed Tiffany Boguslawski over the edge.

The 19-year-old aspiring politician knew she wanted to be a lawyer, but the new president, who shares her hard-line stance on immigration and international trade, sealed the deal.

Boguslawski, a triple-major in political science, history and global affairs, is among a group of students across the political spectrum who were so moved by last November’s election that they decided to take the Law School Admissions Test, or LSAT, because they view law school as a means to making a difference.

In the past year, the number of people taking the test, which is administered nationally four times a year, has surged. In February, 21,400 people took it, up 5.4 percent from a year earlier. In June, the number of test-takers was up 19.8 percent year-over-year, to 27,606 people. And the number of people who took the test in September rose 10.7 percent from a year ago, to 37,146 people. As of Oct. 30, registrations for the Dec. 2 exam were up 21.4 percent.

In 2013, 84.5 percent of graduates fresh out of law school found jobs, a substantial decline from headier days. In 2007, nearly 92 percent of law grads nationwide found jobs. Since then, the job market is slowly reaching a new normal. In Chicago area there are 23,000 lawyers, who make on average, $134,200.

The job market is “way better than it was in the worst of the aftermath of the recession,” said James Leipold, executive director of the National Association of Law Placement. “It’s not nearly as good as it was in the glory days before the recession.”

The only real area of job growth has been at the biggest law firms, with 500 or more attorneys. “Hiring at the other (small and midsized) law firms have been flat or fewer jobs,” he said, adding,“The biggest law firms are still hiring about 1,000 fewer associates than they did before the recession.”

For some wannabe attorneys, the numbers mean keeping your eye on the prize, regardless of the political climate.

Robert Baurley, a senior and co-founder of Loyola’s Pre-Law Society, knew he wanted to be a lawyer years before Trump was elected. Baurley, 22, took the LSAT in September and plans to take it again next year to improve his score. He’s interned with an assistant district attorney in his native Pennsylvania, he said, and is working to get into his dream school, the University of Pennsylvania Law School.

As far as Baurley, is concerned, people motivated by the election of Donald Trump should reassess why they want to invest in a legal education. The current political climate Baurley said, is merely a momentary glimpse of time. “For me, I’ve known forever that I wanted to be an attorney.”

crshropshire@chicagotribune.com

Twitter @corilyns

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Law Firm Files Suit In Behalf Of Woodmore School Secretary, Teacher In Connection With Bus Wreck

Berke, Berke & Berke filed two lawsuits in Circuit Court on behalf of teachers and staff members of Woodmore Elementary School.

The lawsuits stem from the bus tragedy that occurred on Nov. 21, 2016 in which six students were killed.

The law firms said, “The complaints allege that the teachers and staff members of Woodmore Elementary School suffered greatly as a result of the negligence of Defendants Durham School Services, L.P., National Express, LLC, and Johnthony Walker.

“When the defendants failed to provide safe transportation for the children at Woodmore Elementary, the teachers and staff who provide daily care for these children and who have close emotional ties to these children, sustained acute emotional trauma as they tried to cope with both the immediate and long term aftermath of the tragedy.

“The complaints further allege that Defendants Durham and National Express are guilty of negligently hiring Walker to drive the bus; negligently training him; negligently continuing to employ him after receiving numerous complaints; failing to properly supervise him; failing to install monitoring equipment to monitor him; failing to pay reasonable wages in order to obtain competent drivers; and failing to operate their system in a manner that would ensure the lives and safety of the children they were transporting. They also are guilty of guilty of negligence, gross negligence, and willful and wanton conduct demonstrating a conscious indifference to the lives and safety of others.”

One suit is filed in the name of Alisha Bibbs, school secretary.

Another is in the name of teacher Stephanie Muhammad and her husband, Sabir Muhammad.

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Financial firms stall settlement talks amid U.S. consumer watchdog upheaval

WASHINGTON (Reuters) – The bargaining positions have shifted for financial firms in the crosshairs of the U.S. Consumer Financial Protection Bureau (CFPB) after its director announced this week he would be leaving.

Consumer Financial Protection Bureau Director Richard Cordray speaks in Washington, October 17, 2014. REUTERS/Larry Downing

The departure of Richard Cordray at the end of the month gives companies being pursued by the CFPB for alleged predatory lending practices added incentive to stall settlement talks until Republican President Donald Trump puts his own appointee in place, lawyers and analysts say.

Wall Street has long-expected Trump to nominate a CFPB head who will go easier on the industry and some companies such as student loan servicer Navient (NAVI.O) and lender TCF National Bank (TCF.N) already have gone to court to fend off large fines while Cordray – renowned for imposing steep penalties- is still in place.

A Navient spokeswoman said in an email the company would focus on defending itself against the CFPB’s “unfounded and politically motivated” allegations that it misled millions of borrowers, driving up their loan repayment costs.

A TCF spokesman rejected the CFPB’s claim that the company “tricked” consumers into costly overdraft fees, saying in a statement TCF had “complied at all times with the letter and spirit” of the law.

Behind the scenes, other firms have been dragging out settlement talks – spending months wrangling over the extent of their liability, how consumers should be compensated and penalties calculated – all the while hoping for a sympathetic regime change, several lawyers working on dozens of cases told Reuters.

RELATED COVERAGE

Commentary: How Trump is making it easier to exploit consumers

These companies will be emboldened to continue to hold out for better settlement terms in the belief new leadership at the CFPB will be unlikely to take them to court if they do not play ball.

THE CFPB, created by Democratic President Barack Obama in the wake of the 2008 financial crisis, is a lightning rod for criticism by Republicans, who argue that it has too much power.

“There is a more likely prospect for companies to get good settlement terms, in part because many would be willing to walk away from the negotiation table,” said Quyen Truong, a partner at law firm Stroock & Stroock & Lavan who was the assistant director and deputy general counsel for the CFPB until early 2016.

“There is little doubt that litigated cases ultimately would play out under new Republican leadership who would be much less inclined to pursue aggressive claims than the current CFPB leadership.”

The CFPB did not respond to a request for comment on how it would handle pending enforcement actions under a new director, but in a statement on Wednesday Cordray said he trusted new leadership would see the “value” of the agency’s efforts and “work to preserve it.”

BORDERLINE CASES

Cordray is the CFPB’s first and only director and under him it has pursued auto dealers, student lenders and credit card companies for alleged consumer abuses – forcing them to pay about $12 billion in fines and remedies, according to its own data.

Consumer advocates say the agency plays a critical role protecting consumers against financial abuse but Republican Party members, legal experts and defendants say it has repeatedly pursued cases outside its jurisdiction.

A Trump appointee likely would review all the CFPB’s pending litigation and pre-litigation enforcement actions, and could ultimately drop borderline cases or move to swiftly settle them on generous terms, lawyers and analysts said.

They highlighted the CFPB’s current actions against TCF, Navient, mortgage servicer Ocwen Financial Corp. (OCN)N>, mortgage company PHH Corp. (PHH.N) and consumer finance group World Acceptance Corp. (WRLD.O) as cases that might be quickly resolved. Shares in these companies closed up on Wednesday, when Cordray announced his departure.

“We have been and remain open to dialogue with the CFPB regarding its concerns, regardless of Mr. Cordray’s involvement with the bureau,” the TCF spokesman said. “We will continue to work through the legal process.”

OcWen, PHH Corp and World Acceptance did not respond to requests for comment.

“If it’s the kind of case where I feel that Cordray and his staff have been pushing the envelope … then, yeah, I’d want to make sure that I didn’t enter into a consent order with the bureau before there is a director in place that has taken a fresh look,” said Alan Kaplinsky, co-practice leader of the Consumer Financial Services Group at law firm Ballard Spahr.

Kaplinsky was not referring to any specific case.

Reporting by Michelle Price; Editing by Carmel Crimmins and Bill Trott

Our Standards:The Thomson Reuters Trust Principles.

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Pomerantz Law Firm Announces the Filing of a Class Action against Acorda Therapeutics, Inc. and Certain Officers – ACOR

NEW YORK, Nov. 17, 2017 (GLOBE NEWSWIRE) — Pomerantz LLP announces that a class action lawsuit has been filed against Acorda Therapeutics, Inc. (“Acorda” or the “Company”) (NASDAQ:ACOR) and certain of its officers.  The class action, filed in United States District Court, for the Southern District of New York, and docketed under 17-cv-08997, is on behalf of a class consisting of investors who purchased or otherwise acquired Acorda securities, seeking to recover compensable damages caused by defendants’ violations of the Securities Exchange Act of 1934.

If you are a shareholder who purchased Acorda securities between April 18, 2016, and November 14, 2017, both dates inclusive, you have until January 17, 2018, to ask the Court to appoint you as Lead Plaintiff for the class.  A copy of the Complaint can be obtained at www.pomerantzlaw.com.  To discuss this action, contact Robert S. Willoughby at rswilloughby@pomlaw.com or 888.476.6529 (or 888.4-POMLAW), toll-free, Ext. 9980. Those who inquire by e-mail are encouraged to include their mailing address, telephone number, and amount of shares purchased. 

[Click here to join this class action]

Acorda is a biotechnology company with a focus on the identification, development, and commercialization of therapies for neurological disorders.  On January 19, 2016, Acorda announced an agreement to acquire Biotie Therapies Corporation (“Biotie”) for approximately $363 million (the “Biotie Acquisition”).  In its press release announcing the Biotie Acquisition, Acorda advised investors, inter alia, that the Company “will obtain worldwide rights to tozadenant, an oral adenosine A2a receptor antagonist currently in Phase 3 development in Parkinson’s disease (PD).”  On April 18, 2016, Acorda acquired approximately 93% of the fully diluted capital stock of Biotie.  In September 2016, Acorda completed the Biotie Acquisition.

The Complaint alleges that throughout the Class Period, Defendants made materially false and misleading statements regarding the Company’s business, operational and compliance policies. Specifically, Defendants made false and/or misleading statements and/or failed to disclose that:  (i) tozadenant entailed significant undisclosed safety risks; (ii) accordingly, the Company had overstated tozadenant’s approval prospects and commercial viability; (iii) for the foregoing reasons, the Company had likewise overstated the benefits of the Biotie Acquisition; and (iv) as a result of the foregoing, Acorda’s shares traded at artificially inflated prices during the Class Period, and class members suffered significant losses and damages.

On November 15, 2017, Acorda disclosed the deaths of several patients in the Company’s final-stage studies of tozadenant.  Acorda advised investors that it had paused new enrollment in the drug’s long-term safety studies, pending further discussion with the independent Data Safety Monitoring Board and the U.S. Food and Drug Administration.

On this news, Acorda’s share price fell $11.20, or 39.72%, to close at $17.00 on November 15, 2017.

The Pomerantz Firm, with offices in New York, Chicago, Florida, and Los Angeles, is acknowledged as one of the premier firms in the areas of corporate, securities, and antitrust class litigation. Founded by the late Abraham L. Pomerantz, known as the dean of the class action bar, the Pomerantz Firm pioneered the field of securities class actions. Today, more than 80 years later, the Pomerantz Firm continues in the tradition he established, fighting for the rights of the victims of securities fraud, breaches of fiduciary duty, and corporate misconduct. The Firm has recovered numerous multimillion-dollar damages awards on behalf of class members. See www.pomerantzlaw.com

CONTACT:
Robert S. Willoughby
Pomerantz LLP
rswilloughby@pomlaw.com

 

/EIN News/ —  


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Two law firms unite to launch African Connection Protection to rescue investors from 419 Scams

ABUJA, Nigeria, Nov. 16, 2017 (GLOBE NEWSWIRE) — Today two law firms announce the Business African Connection Protection (BACP) program for business investors considering or currently involved with investment opportunities in Africa. International law firm Robert Peterson & Fields Associates, P.C. and Nigeria-based law firm, Law Office of Roberts & Shoda. The program will be the first cooperative to launch a legal services program to global investors who want to get involved with an investment or business opportunity in Africa. 

A photo accompanying this announcement is available at http://www.globenewswire.com/NewsRoom/AttachmentNg/b107b537-561b-4226-aa3a-b15ad5f7f7b4

Over the past two decades, or more since the beginning of the internet-era going mainstream, there have been an epidemic of international scams that range from everything to counterfeit cashier checks, bogus letters of credit and bank guarantees, counterfeit ‘black’ or ‘marked’ dollar bills that require special processing to remove ink or markings, bogus government documents delivered by corrupt government officials (or impostors posing as African government leaders), or the more notorious 419 letter scams.

This press article is definitely not to libel or slander African businesses or trading commerce in Africa. Cary Lee Peterson, a representative at Robert Peterson & Fields Associates says that “the purpose of this new service is to save clients time and money when considering getting involved with an investment opportunity in Africa that have cost hundreds and thousands of victims time and money that can cause irreparable damage and harm to your family or business with no possible recourse to recover or seek justice for the parties that defrauded them; some who aren’t even based in Africa when the initial scam is perpetrated.”

Earlier this year a high profile businessman from New York City, who is a semi-celebrity co-starring in a popular reality TV series, contacted Cary Peterson about some investments that he had made in Ghana and South Africa over the few years. The puzzling part about this client is that he had an American business partner based in Ghana to oversee the investment projects but the alleged fraudsters were ‘pulling the wool over his eyes’, which led his American partner in Manhattan to believe that everything was on the up and up. Much like other investment scams, things went sour the day when the two American investors asked to see the books and withdraw cash equity from their investment that was supposedly active and making revenue for several years prior. Attorney Adeniyi Shoda consulted with the two investors and the next week visited Ghana to investigate the business affairs in Ghana and confirmed the American investor’s ventures in African were all faux. None of the documents, statements, or information they received from their business contacts in Ghana were legitimate. The few thousand of dollars the two American men spent on ACBP saved them $75,000 that their business contact in Ghana said would be required to release of their funds made through their business investment.  

The new anti-fraud solution will help clients investigate a gold mine, gold bullion bars in the D.R. Congo, or diamonds in Equatorial Guinea with supposed ‘Kimberly’ certifications. Nonetheless, a potential investor should take the same precautions as they do when they’re contemplating buying real estate, acquiring a company, or making any type of substantial investment anywhere else in the world — it’s best to contact an attorney.

The ‘Business African Connection’ will cost a client less than $10,000 as opposed to pouring $25,000, $50,000, or $100,000 from your life savings, corporate credit line, or home equity line into a confidence scam that could be an independent grifter using social media to fleece his targets or an international crime ring with fifty to one hundred players that enable the coordination of a complex confidence scheme.

ABOUT LAW OFFICE OF ROBERTS & SHODA

The law firm of thirteen lawyers is licensed to practice law in the Federal Republic of Nigeria and other countries of West Africa. One of the services the firm provides is to run due diligence for clients by verifying documents and business proposals with government agencies in Africa. The firm has many years of experience in corporate law has proved invaluable in meeting the needs of our Clients in this respect.

ABOUT ROBERT PETERSON & FIELDS ASSOCIATES, P.C.

The law firm held in U.S. and Micronesia has over thirty legal associates, with branch offices in California, Colorado, Washington D.C., Canada, Europe, United Arab Emirates, and Australia. The firm offers attorney and paralegal services for lobbying, international affairs, governmental law, and elections law. Providing clients with robust advisory and representation with over 11 years in business and 200 years of attorney experience among over 30 attorney associates, collectively.

Contact for Consultation: consultation@rpflegal.com, or visit www.rpflegal.com

Media Contact: Devin Blake – dblake@columnist.com 


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Class Action Filed Against Tesla by CCRLG and Bryan Schwartz Law, Two Bay Area Civil Rights Law Firms

California Civil Rights Law Group and Bryan Schwartz Law have filed a class action lawsuit against Tesla, Inc., on behalf of current and former African-American Employees. Details of the lawsuit can be found in the official Complaint available on the CCRLG website.

Fremont, CA (PRWEB) November 16, 2017

California Civil Rights Law Group and Bryan Schwartz Law have filed a class action lawsuit against Tesla, Inc. on behalf of current and former African-American employees. Details of the lawsuit are available on the official Complaint which can be viewed online at http://www.civilrightsca.com/2017/11/13/tesla-complaint/.

The suit was filed jointly by two Oakland-based civil rights law firms, California Civil Rights Law Group (CCRLG) and Bryan Schwartz Law. Attorneys of both firms are available for media inquiries either via the web link above or by calling (415) 453-4740.

The lawsuit was filed in Alameda County Superior Court under Docket No. RG17882082. A PDF copy of the complaint is available at http://www.civilrightsca.com/wp-content/uploads/2017/11/2017-11-13-Complaint-File-Stamped-Copy.pdf.

About California Civil Rights Law Group

The California Civil Rights Law Group (http://www.civilrightsca.com/), led by prominent trial attorney Larry Organ, is dedicated to furthering the cause of employee civil rights throughout the state. The legal team has made it its priority to provide help to those who need it the most, and specializes in representing plaintiffs in matters involving race, sex and disability harassment, discrimination, retaliation and wrongful termination.

About Bryan Schwartz Law

Bryan Schwartz Law (http://www.bryanschwartzlaw.com) is dedicated to continuing the struggle for civil rights and equality of employment opportunity and helping Americans from every background to achieve their highest career potential. The firm has recovered tens of millions of dollars in individual, class, and collective actions involving discrimination and retaliation, harassment, denied disability accommodations, whistleblower reprisal, wage and hour violations, Federal employees’ rights, and severance negotiations.

For the original version on PRWeb visit: http://www.prweb.com/releases/2017/11/prweb14916029.htm

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U.S. News Best Lawyers 2018 Best Law Firms List Honors Littler’s of Charleston with Tier 1 Metropolitan Ranking

The Charleston, WV, office of Littler, the world’s largest employment and labor law practice representing management, has earned “Tier 1” rankings for the practice area of Employment Law in the 2018 U.S. News – Best Lawyers® “Best Law Firms” list.

In addition to firmwide top rankings in three practice areas, Littler earned “Tier 1” rankings in 39 metropolitan markets.

The “Best Law Firms” rankings follow the recently released 2018 edition of The Best Lawyers in America© in which more than 200 Littler attorneys were recognized, including Charleston Shareholder Constance H. Weber, who was also named “Lawyer of the Year” in Charleston.

Firms included in the 2018 “Best Law Firms” list are recognized for professional excellence with consistently impressive ratings from clients and peers. Achieving a tiered ranking indicates a unique combination of quality law practice and breadth of legal expertise. Over 13,000 attorneys provided more than 1 million law firm assessments, and over 7,500 clients provided more than 65,000 evaluations. The entire list of the rankings is available by visiting bestlawfirms.usnews.com.

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